my english bulldog

Description

The Bulldog is small in stature, but wide and compact, with a thick, massive head. Its head should be broad (the broader the more prized) with cheeks that extend to the sides of the eyes. The skin on the skull and forehead should fall in dense folds. Its muzzle is short and pug, its nose, broad and black with large nostrils. Its upper lip is pendent and its lower jaw should be very undershot. Eyes are very round, far apart and very dark. The ears should be small and thin, folded back in the form of a rose. The tail is short and carries low. The coat comes in red, fawn, brindle, pale yellow or washed-out red, or white, and can combine any of these colors. Black is not acceptable. The Muzzle is sometimes dark. With its stocky legs set squarely at each corner of its compact, muscular body, the Bulldog’s deliberate gain has become a waddle.

Temperament

Although the English Bulldogs appearance can be somewhat intimidating, it is among the gentlest of dogs. Just the same it will see off any intruder, and few would risk a close encounter with a dog brave enough to bait a bull. It is described as a very affectionate and dependable animal, gentle with children, but known for its courage and its excellent guarding abilities. Bullheaded and determined, this breed can be very persistent. They do not give up easily. Bulldogs are very much a peoples dog seeking out human attention and loving every bit it can get!! A lot of human attention is required for the breed’s happiness. Some English Bulldogs can be a bit dominating and need an owner who knows how to display strong leadership and understands alpha canine behavior. A Bulldog who understands it’s *place* in the human pack, is nice to, and reliable with all people. This breed is good with family pets, but some can be scrappy with strange dogs if they do not see themselves as followers in their pack. When Bulldogs are young, they are full of energy, but slow down as they get older. They snore very loudly, and most have drool and slobber tendencies. Bulldogs who display guarding, behaviors, such as guarding furniture, food, toys, or other spots in the house, or who are dog aggressive, do not have humans who are being the dogs pack leader. This behavior only happens when dogs are allowed to take over. These behaviors can be corrected when the owners start displaying the proper leadership. Dogs who feel they need to run the home are not as happy as dogs who know they are human followers, as it is very stressful for a dog to need to keep “his” humans in line.

Height, Weight

Height: about 12-16 inches (31-40 cm.) (there is no prescribed height, but shorter Bulldogs are more prized when being shown)
Weight: Dogs 53-55 pounds (24-25kg.) Bitches 49-51 pounds (22-23kg.)

Health Problems

Breathing problems; some have small windpipes as well. Also poor eyesight, very susceptible to heat stroke in warm weather or hot rooms and cars. Very cold sensitive. Puppies often delivered by caesarian section because of their broad heads. Its digestive system is very active and may be offensive to people with sensitive noses. Susceptible to skin infections. Also hip and knee problems.

Living Conditions

The English Bulldog is good for apartment life. They are very inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is an indoor dog. Bulldogs do best in temperate climates as the breed can chill easily in cold weather and have trouble cooling off in very hot weather.

Exercise

Some adult Bulldogs would just as soon not take any exercise, while others are full of energy. In any case all Bulldogs need to be taken on daily walks to fulfill their primal canine instinct to walk. Fit English Bulldogs are capable of moving very quickly for short periods of time.

Life Expectancy

An average of 8 years. Some live longer while others live shorter lives.

Litter Size

4 – 5 puppies – As a result of this breed’s large head they are prone to needing a caesarian section

Grooming

The smooth, fine, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when necessary. Wipe the face with a damp cloth every day to clean inside the wrinkles. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

Today’s bulldog has a very different temperament from those of his ancestors. The breed is descended from the ancient Asiatic mastiff, but its development took place completely in Great Britain. The name bulldog, which is medieval in origin, refers not only to the robust look of a little bull, which this aggressive dog has, but also to the power with which this dog attacked bulls in arena combat before that practice was prohibited by law in the nineteenth century.

Group

Mastiff, AKC Non-Sporting

Recognition

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR

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English Bulldogs

Description

The Bulldog is small in stature, but wide and compact, with a thick, massive head. Its head should be broad (the broader the more prized) with cheeks that extend to the sides of the eyes. The skin on the skull and forehead should fall in dense folds. Its muzzle is short and pug, its nose, broad and black with large nostrils. Its upper lip is pendent and its lower jaw should be very undershot. Eyes are very round, far apart and very dark. The ears should be small and thin, folded back in the form of a rose. The tail is short and carries low. The coat comes in red, fawn, brindle, pale yellow or washed-out red, or white, and can combine any of these colors. Black is not acceptable. The Muzzle is sometimes dark. With its stocky legs set squarely at each corner of its compact, muscular body, the Bulldog’s deliberate gain has become a waddle.

Temperament

Although the English Bulldogs appearance can be somewhat intimidating, it is among the gentlest of dogs. Just the same it will see off any intruder, and few would risk a close encounter with a dog brave enough to bait a bull. It is described as a very affectionate and dependable animal, gentle with children, but known for its courage and its excellent guarding abilities. Bullheaded and determined, this breed can be very persistent. They do not give up easily. Bulldogs are very much a peoples dog seeking out human attention and loving every bit it can get!! A lot of human attention is required for the breed’s happiness. Some English Bulldogs can be a bit dominating and need an owner who knows how to display strong leadership and understands alpha canine behavior. A Bulldog who understands it’s *place* in the human pack, is nice to, and reliable with all people. This breed is good with family pets, but some can be scrappy with strange dogs if they do not see themselves as followers in their pack. When Bulldogs are young, they are full of energy, but slow down as they get older. They snore very loudly, and most have drool and slobber tendencies. Bulldogs who display guarding, behaviors, such as guarding furniture, food, toys, or other spots in the house, or who are dog aggressive, do not have humans who are being the dogs pack leader. This behavior only happens when dogs are allowed to take over. These behaviors can be corrected when the owners start displaying the proper leadership. Dogs who feel they need to run the home are not as happy as dogs who know they are human followers, as it is very stressful for a dog to need to keep “his” humans in line.

Height, Weight

Height: about 12-16 inches (31-40 cm.) (there is no prescribed height, but shorter Bulldogs are more prized when being shown)
Weight: Dogs 53-55 pounds (24-25kg.) Bitches 49-51 pounds (22-23kg.)

Health Problems

Breathing problems; some have small windpipes as well. Also poor eyesight, very susceptible to heat stroke in warm weather or hot rooms and cars. Very cold sensitive. Puppies often delivered by caesarian section because of their broad heads. Its digestive system is very active and may be offensive to people with sensitive noses. Susceptible to skin infections. Also hip and knee problems.

Living Conditions

The English Bulldog is good for apartment life. They are very inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is an indoor dog. Bulldogs do best in temperate climates as the breed can chill easily in cold weather and have trouble cooling off in very hot weather.

Exercise

Some adult Bulldogs would just as soon not take any exercise, while others are full of energy. In any case all Bulldogs need to be taken on daily walks to fulfill their primal canine instinct to walk. Fit English Bulldogs are capable of moving very quickly for short periods of time.

Life Expectancy

An average of 8 years. Some live longer while others live shorter lives.

Litter Size

4 – 5 puppies – As a result of this breed’s large head they are prone to needing a caesarian section

Grooming

The smooth, fine, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when necessary. Wipe the face with a damp cloth every day to clean inside the wrinkles. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

Today’s bulldog has a very different temperament from those of his ancestors. The breed is descended from the ancient Asiatic mastiff, but its development took place completely in Great Britain. The name bulldog, which is medieval in origin, refers not only to the robust look of a little bull, which this aggressive dog has, but also to the power with which this dog attacked bulls in arena combat before that practice was prohibited by law in the nineteenth century.

Group

Mastiff, AKC Non-Sporting

Recognition

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR

Bull Terrier Bulldog

Description :
The Bull terrier is a strong, athletic and energetic dog that is capable of doing a multitude of tasks including watch dogging and protecting as well as agility and obedience events. They are also ideal family dogs with clownish personalities and a loving temperament when properly trained and socialized.

The Bull terrier has a very distinctive head and is rarely mistaken for any other breed by those that are familiar with their characteristics. The head is almost totally oval in profile from the skull through to the tip of the nose. The shape of the face should be full without any hollow areas or concavity to the profile. The eyes are very small and almond shaped, centered towards the middle of the head for a distinct appearance. In some literature the eyes are described as triangular in shape, and in some Bull terriers this is a very accurate description. The eyes should be located closer to the ears than to the nose, adding to the appearance of length on the face below the eyes. The ears are very pointed and rather thin, placed close together on the top of the skull. They should be relaxed most of the time but can be held absolutely erect with the dog is attending to something.

The neck is thick and slightly arching and longer than that of most mastiff or bulldog types. The shoulders are heavy set and well developed with a very deep and wide chest. The front legs are stocky and short, well set to the outside of the deep chest. The brisket or bottom of the chest should be significantly deeper than the abdomen area. The back is short and strong looking with muscular loins and a well developed rib cage. Although the appearance is solid the body should not look overly heavy or disproportionate to the rest of the dog.

The legs of the Bull terrier should be strong with good bones and excellent conformation. They should neither turn out or in at the knees or hocks or at the feet. The feet are round and arched, similar to that of a cat. The dog should be light on his or her feet, and should not shuffle or drag the feet in any gait, although they do often appear to almost roll from side to side when in movement. The movement should appear smooth and fluid with a good length to the strides and a typical “I am in control” attitude present in the movement.

The tail of the Bull terrier is moderately long and set low on the hindquarters. It is usually carried horizontal with the ground and is tapered from the thick base to the tip at the end. The skin of the Bull terrier should be tight against the body without noticeable wrinkles or folds anywhere on the body.

Temperament

The Bull terrier is a fun loving, people loving and highly attentive type of dog. Their unique face shape often makes them appear very focused and attentive to their owners, and they are known to seem to understand what the owner is thinking and planning to do. As a breed they are often described as clownish despite their rather aggressive start in the dog world. Now the breed is known as a gentle, kind dog rather than the fighting dog it originally was intended as.

The Bull terrier requires human attention and interaction to be happy and secure. They absolutely love children and are energetic and sturdy enough to be wonderful companions for kids of all ages. Younger children may need time to get used to the affectionate and somewhat energetic play of the Bull terrier. The Bull terrier, as with many terrier breeds, becomes rather possessive and jealous of both people and objects so needs to be taught to share. Teasing is also a problem with this breed and children and adults must learn not to engage in any type of play the dog may misinterpret as teasing. They are not considered appropriate for a home where they would be alone more than they are in the presence of the family or where they would be kept in a kennel. The Bull terrier is a good watchdog and will bark to notify the family when a stranger approaches, however they are not likely to be highly protective or be an effective guard dog, it is simply not in their nature to be aggressive towards people.

With other dogs however the Bull terrier can be very dog aggressive if not socialized at a young age. Male Bull terriers that are intact are the most aggressive and are not recommended for homes with other intact males or even neutered males of dominant types of breeds. Males and females that are spayed and neutered can become good companions for each other, but slow introductions or raising them together from puppies is recommended.

The Bull terrier has a high prey drive and is not appropriate for homes with other pets. Sometimes, when raised together from a very young age, the Bull terrier will get along well with cats, however this does require a lot of care and supervision by the owner.

10-14 years

1-9 puppies per litter with 4-5 the average

Mastiff, AKC Terrier

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR

white or any color with white markings. Brindle, fawn, brown and tan are common colors with or without white markings.

Short

Medium, Large

Moderate Shed

20-24 inches (51-61 cm)

45-80 pounds (20-36 kg)

20-24 inches (51-61 cm)

45-80 pounds (20-36 kg)

The Bull terrier can live in small spaces such as an apartment with enough exercise. They will do well with a small, fenced yard and regular walks. As a short haired dog they prefer being indoors than outside and cannot tolerate extreme cold.

Training

Training the Bull terrier is critical to ensuring that the dog is well behaved and well mannered both in and outside of the home. They do need regular interaction and socialization with other dogs and people to minimize the risk that they will become highly dog aggressive and overly possessive of their home and family. As a dominant breed of dog they need firm and consistent yet positive and loving training, especially as puppies. Establishing that the humans are in control with these dogs is critical, as they will quickly develop bad habits if they think that they are in control.

The Bull terrier is a very intelligent dog and will learn who he or she needs to listen to and which family members they can ignore or respond in a limited way too. One person should initially work with the puppy until the commands are understood, then the others in the family should also work with the dog. The Bull terrier often will simply ignore the commands of those it seems as “below” it on the family hierarchy, so everyone must work with the dog.

As an energetic and active dog, especially as a puppy, the Bull terrier should never be engaged in games that pit strength of people against the strength of the dog. Wrestling or tug-of-war type games are likely to increase dominance type behaviors as well as possessiveness and territoriality. In addition they are often prone to jumping up with their front feet on people, something which is often frightening to kids and adults alike, so teaching them to sit for attention is important.

Lead or leash training is essential for the breed at an early age. A Bull terrier should always be controlled when outside of the yard, particularly intact males. Early leash training through an obedience program is important as with proper socialization these dogs can be taught to be off the leash.

Many people choose to use their Bull terriers in obedience and agility type events. This breed can excel at these competitions and are eager and willing to perform in front of crowds or groups. Their natural fearlessness and good humor is evident in their attitude towards the competition.

American Staffordshire Terriers Bulldog

Description

The stocky and muscular look of the American Staffordshire Terrier makes this particular dog breed not only impressive, but also slightly intimidating to strangers and other dogs. The strength of this agile dog is apparent from the outer appearance. With a powerful and broad head structure, the short muzzle is accentuated by a strong set jawbone. The ears of the American Staffordshire Terrier are often short and cropped.

Like its cousin the American Pitt Bull Terrier, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a tough looking dog, but the American Staffordshire Terrier is often the larger of the two with a thicker bone structure, weight, and overall head size. The teeth are set in a scissors bite. The coat of this breed is short and shiny, making it simple to take care of for a wide range of owners.

The eyes of the American Staffordshire Terrier are black and round, with a stern expression that can be perceived as both intimidating and alert. However, with a closer look, the American Staffordshire Terrier seems to be more of a lover than a fighter. Affectionate and loving, this dog breed works well in a family setting and can be a powerful guard dog if necessary.

Temperament

With its powerful stance, it’s no wonder that the American Staffordshire Terrier is a natural guard dog. This is a dog breed that naturally will want to protect its family and anyone it deems a part of its pack. The pack mentality in this particular breed is strong, so once you’ve asserted that you are a part of their pack, they will fiercely protect you.

When they feel they are threatened, these are dogs that will become aggressive and even bite the intruder. Unlike other breeds, the American Staffordshire Terrier will also actively protect their owner’s property too. This is an excellent combination for those that want that extra layer of protection for their home.

What’s more is that the American Staffordshire Terrier is a persistent fighter that will continue to fight until they feel the attacker or intruder is subdued. This tenacity is helpful in dangerous situations can be problematic if they aren’t taught properly who is friend and who is foe. These lessons will need to begin as quickly as possible including socialization with other pets and children that are in the home. Once this dog learns who their ‘family’ is, they will be docile and loving. This breed has actually been bred to be a family dog over the years. So while you should never leave a dog alone with a young child, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a good breed for all ages.

If a dog is left unsocialized, it might have troubles interacting with other dogs. When the American Staffordshire Terrier feels it is being backed into a corner (whether figuratively or literally), it can lash out and become aggressive.

Stable and outgoing, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a breed that will be fun to have around the house. They want to do nothing but please their master, so they will be willing to do whatever it takes to make you happy.

However, that said, it should also be noted that the American Staffordshire Terrier is a dog that can be difficult to housetrain. You will need to spend extra time with these lessons to ensure this dog doesn’t create a bathroom of your home’s interior.

Another thing to consider is that while this dog is a loving breed to have in a family setting, it does not do well with an owner that is not willing to assert their authority. The American Staffordshire Terrier takes the idea of pack order very seriously, so you will need to find ways to show that you are in charge of it in order to receive respect in return.

9 – 15 years.

4 – 8 puppies with the average being 6 puppies

Terrier, Terriers

CKC, FCI, AKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, ACR

Black/White, Red/White, Fawn/White, Blue/White, and even Brindle/White.

Short

Large

Moderate Shed

17-19 inches (43-48 cm.)

57-67 pounds (25-30 kg.)

16-18 inches (41-46 cm.)

57-67 pounds (25-30 kg.)

Like many other breeds, the American Staffordshire Terrier will be quite content with apartment or small house living so long as they get enough exercise. Even if you don’t have a yard, this breed will be happy, as they can be active indoors and keep their fitness levels up. Because of their thinner coat and sensitive skin, it’s best that the American Staffordshire Terrier is kept in warmer climates in order to keep them comfortable.

Training

The most important thing to realize about the American Staffordshire Terrier is that it bases its world on the idea of a pack order. This means that it believes that someone is going to be the leader of its life, whether that distinction is theirs or it is their owners, this is the result of training. Making sure the American Staffordshire Terrier is trained early to know that you are the authority can be a challenging task for any owner. But if you’re someone that doesn’t like to assert authority, it will be especially tricky, if not impossible to control this sort of breed.

You will need to constantly remind the American Staffordshire Terrier that they are not the ones in charge and that you are. This will take consistent discipline and commands to help monitor their progress along the way. Many owners find that some assistance in an obedience class setting can help them get this training started, but since the dog will be in your care for most of the time, you need to be willing and able to keep up the lessons.

While the American Staffordshire Terrier doesn’t necessarily need to be attended to at every moment, this is a breed that likes to interact with its master. This might include tasks in which they can do something that will please you – i.e. fetching and pulling on a chew toy. You want to give this dog a lot of praise when you are training it, so that it knows it is pleasing you. This is the best way to approach training with this particular breed as negative training can often cause the dog to become upset or even defensive. However, if the American Staffordshire Terrier does do something it’s not supposed to, you will need to be firm to assert your authority and ensure that the action does not happen again.

Though they have a reputation for being guard dogs, some of their skills will have to come from you. For example, the American Staffordshire Terrier will not naturally bark at the door or at strangers, so you may need to teach them to do this, if this is a behavior you want encouraged.

You will also need to realize that even if you aren’t overtly trying to tell your American Staffordshire Terrier something, they can often pick up on subtle cues in your behavior. For example, if you’re not firm in your training, they will not be consistent in their resulting behaviors.

A American Staffordshire Terrier that is not trained well will often bark excessively, become aggressive and overly dominant, as well as have troubles with urinating.

House training is of particular concern with this intelligent breed. If their owner is not firm about what is acceptable and what is not acceptable, you can create a situation in which the dog is urinating or defecating all over the house. It will help you to be firm with the dog right from the beginning in terms of what you expect for house training. You may also want to take classes in obedience training in this area prior to your dog’s arrival in your home.

American Pit Bull Terrier Bulldog

Description :
The American Pit Bull Terrier is a mid-sized breed of dog in the terrier group. They are known for their intelligence, strength, loyalty and friendliness. They make wonderful family dogs and pets for the children always wanting to take care of them.

They are a strong solidly built muscular dog with a short and stiff single layer of hair that can be almost any color. The ears are occasionally cropped, with a short tapered tail.

The coat is short, single layered, and stiff but glossy. The ears are rose colore and semipricked and eyes can be almost any color except blue. The blocky head is wedge-shaped with wrinkles on top.

There has been negative publicity about them in recent years, not due to the actual behavior of the American Pit Bull Terrier, but do to misbreeding of different types of “pit bull like” terriers with the intent of making tough guard dogs. Because of the similarity in looks of some of these “pit bull” terriers, the pit bulls, in general have unfairly been labeled as mean, untrustworthy and actually restricted and banned in some parts of the world. Many of these instances stemmed from bad owners that mistreated and almost starved the dogs to make them mean rather than from the dog itself.

Owners of the American Pit Bull Terrier dispute these allegations against the dog and claim they are wonderfully, intelligent, loving dogs that with proper discipline and obedience training make wonderful family pets for all ages.

The American Kennel Club does not recognize the American Pit Bull Terrier, although the United Kennel Club and the American Pit Bull Registry recognize them.

Temperament

The temperament of the American Pit Bull Terrier can be described in many ways with the most consistent terms being friendly and goofy. They are known for their great intelligence, sound nerve and character and make a great family dog and pet. They are friendly towards everyone they see whether it’s family, friends or strangers. The American Pit Bull Terrier makes a great dog for children, rough housing with them yet protecting them from harm if need be.

They are known for their high prey drive, so they do consider birds, rabbits or other small animals as fair game. This is bred in their genetics, but basic obedience training started at a very young age will help curtail the problem. If they are raised around other animals they will get along with them fine, never provoking trouble. However, if the other animal instigates a fight, the American Pit Bull Terrier most likely will not walk away.

In recent years, many individuals have breed and cross bred this dog with other bull terriers with the intent of making a guard or attack dog. The media then sensationalized it labeling the “pit bull” as a mean dog, thus giving any kind of pit bull terrier a bad name to the public. In reality, the American Pit Bull Terrier is not any meaner or more of a threat than the German shepherd, collie or any other dog. In fact, because of their friendly nature with people, many owners claim the make poor guard dogs with the property whether the owners are home or not.

Their personality is very friendly, happy and almost goofy as they roll around on the floor playing with their master and family members. If you have more than one American Pit Bull Terrier, it is recommended that you avoid same sexes, especially owning two females. Pit bulls are very slow to mature in temperament, some not fully developing until anywhere from 2 to 4 years of age. Even as a young dog, they are curious, loving, active and playful and love playing with children. It is recommended that children not be left alone with them, but more because the pit bull doesn’t know his own strength and may accidentally knock the child down. The American Pit Bull Terrier has a high tolerance for pain and often doesn’t feel it when children hit them or pull their tail, which may contribute to them being such patient dogs with children.

If you are considering getting an American Pit Bull Terrier puppy, make sure you get one from a reputable breeder. Check out the parents of the puppy as well, if possible. Many behavior problems that arise in dogs later are a result of poor breeding such as mating two aggressive dogs together. With a background like that, good training can only go so far.

12-15 years

6 to 10 puppies

Terrier

CKC, UKC, NKC, APRI, ACR

The colors of the American Pit Bull Terrier may vary and can be almost any solid color with the exception of merle.

Short

Medium, Large

Moderate Shed

16-24 inches

35-65 pounds (16-29 kg)

14-24 inches

30-60 pounds (16-27 kg)

The American Pit Bull Terrier is a dog that can be kept indoors or outdoors, but is best kept indoors with the family. They are very loving and enjoy romping on the floor with kids. They do enjoy running outdoors and should be allowed to run to wear off some of the energy they possess. Due to their high prey drive, it is recommended they be kept on a leash when outdoors so they don’t chase other animals. Because of their high intelligence, it is very easy to housebreak them.

Training

Training for the American Pit Bull Terrier is extremely important to help the dog become the best family dog he can be. By nature, they are loving, loyal and happy dogs that love doing things with the family. Because of their high intelligence, training them is easy; however, training must be with a firm voice. They need consistency in the training and need to know what is expected of them. Any physical punishment will only make the dog upset and will not accomplish anything. They are very clever dogs and will try to get away with as much as they can (as is the case with most dogs!).

Because of their nature bred prey drive, it is very important to socialize them with other animals regularly from a young age if they are expected to coexist with that animal regularly. Due to some of the negative publicity the American Pit Bull Terrier has gained due to other pit bull varieties, you must train the dog at a young age to be sociable nonaggressive in behavior. Basic obedience training is a great way to start. There are many articles online and at your local library involving the American Pit Bull Terrier and methods of training that have been highly effective.

The American Pit Bull Terrier often participates and does very well in agility training. Agility training is making your dog go through a timed numbered obstacle course. The only help he gets from you is body language and verbal commands. This dog does very well in many agility competitions. This training is also a great way for the American Pit Bull Terrier to use up some of his active energy.

Weight pulling is another competition that this pit bull does very well in. They are hooked up to cart with so much weight in it. The dogs compete to pull the most and get to their destination first. The dogs love this and with all their strength, they do very well.

Once the American Pit Bull Terrier masters his basic obedience training, many owners choose to enroll the dog in Schutzund training. Schutzund is a great way to teach your dog self-control and discipline beyond the basic obedience.

Bull Mastiffs Bulldog

Description

The Bullmastiff is a strong looking dog at first glance – and first impressions are correct. With a sold body frame and a powerful stance, this breed can be quite intimidating to the everyday person that encounters it. But while this stocky build appears to be awkward, the overall frame of the Bullmastiff can be quite agile.

The head has wrinkled skin on the surface and is broad in size, though short. The square shape contains a muzzle that’s about one third of the entire head’s size with a dark coloring. With a black nose and larger nostrils, the Bullmastiff is punctuated by piercing hazel eyes that have a focused and intelligent appearance. The ears of the Bullmastiff are set wide on the head and are dark in color and have a v shape. The shortened back portion of this breed is straight and is on the same level as the loin and the withers of the dog. The tail is set high and tapers, reaching to the backs of the legs.

With such an impressive look, it’s no wonder the Bullmastiff is a menacing dog that can help with guarding your family or a single person. Very alert in nature, this is a dog that will protect whoever it deems to be worth protecting. In this loyalty, training can be tricky, but if you start at a young age and work to consistently build trust, you will have a protector and a friend for a long time.

Temperament

Loyal isn’t strong enough of a word to use to describe the Bullmastiff. This is a dog breed that’s often called courageous for its ability and desire to protect those it feels it needs to protect. This protective instinct is not punctuated by a fierce attacking stance, however, but rather an action to divert the danger away from the person that is being threatened. While the Bullmastiff will attack if it feels that is the only option, generally speaking, it will simply just stand between the stranger/intruder and the person the dog is protecting.

The usual response in highly threatening situations is for the dog to physically stop the danger, but if that doesn’t work, the dog will catch the intruder and knock them down, holding them until they are told to let them go. Often, this dog will simply ‘mouth’ on the intruder and not bite them, making them a great watchdog or companion when you’re out at night. However, just like any other dog that’s fearful for its life, in certain situations, it will bite and attack more aggressively.

What should be noted about its protective nature is that the Bullmastiff is protective of PEOPLE, and not necessarily ‘things.’ So, they aren’t necessarily a good choice if you want to protect your home when you’re not around, as they may not feel the draw to protect ‘things.’

The Bullmastiff is a dog that will become attached to its family quite quickly. And in the presence of these people it trusts, it will be docile and loving. Calm by nature, this dog breed is fearless and willful at the same time. If they are trained when they are young, they can be the perfect dog for a family, even with children. But the dog will need to be trained to not act out with children. In any case, even with training, leaving the child alone in the room with the dog is not advised, especially when the child is young. The dog can accidentally run or bump into the child, causing injuries.

Depending on the Bullmastiff, it may or may not get along with other dogs. This largely depends on whether it has been socialized with other dogs when it was young. In many cases, the male Bullmastiff will not do well with other male dogs, so this can be problematic. And in even rarer cases, female Bullmastiffs can be intolerant of other females.

8 to 10 years, though some have lived up to 14 years

4 – 13 puppies with the average little size being 8.

AKC Working, Utility, Guardian Dogs

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR

Fawn or Brindle or Red, each with Black markings on the head.

Short

Extra Large

Moderate Shed

25-27 inches (63-69 cm.)

110-133 pounds (50-60 kg.)

24-26 inches (61-66 cm.)

100-120 pounds (45-54 kg.)

The Bullmastiff doesn’t need a lot of space to be happy, so an apartment can be an ideal living space, so long as it is able to get sufficient exercise time. This is a breed that won’t really move around too much when it’s indoors, but will enjoy a small yard if you have one. It’s good to note that they aren’t tolerant of extreme weather conditions or temperatures.

You will also not want to have a separate pen or kennel for this particular breed. They will want to be close to the family they are protecting and loyal to. If this breed can be in the house and at least near to you, that’s going to keep its mind at ease.

Training

With such a strong appearance, the Bullmastiff is impressive enough in its natural abilities of intimidation, but you need to get a handle on training this dog breed early in its life. Because of the strong need to protect the family it’s with or the person that it deems its owner, you will need to find ways to control this protective instinct without snuffing it out. This can begin with socializing the Bullmastiff when it’s a puppy. Allow this dog to interact with other puppies to help it become more used to other dogs; if that’s the setting you bring it home to.

If you are going to have a family setting around the Bullmastiff, you will want to bring it home as a puppy so that it learns who it needs to feel are its family. When children grow up with this dog breed, there can be a very playful and loving relationship. These dogs can be quite affectionate with those they are owned by and will be protective once this relationship is established – without additional training from you.

As a part of its nature, the Bullmastiff is going to be a drooler and a snorer, so be ready for these behaviors when you first bring this dog home. Puppies will tend to be awkward too when they’re first in the home, but they will gain their agility quickly as they get older.

These Bullmastiffs respond to your tone of voice as they are quite sensitive to the changes, so be sure to remember this when you are training them and maintain a consistent tone.

It can help to bring this dog breed to obedience classes, if possible in your area, but you will need to maintain their lessons once they come home. Consistency is a big thing to keep in mind with this dog breed, as with nearly every breed. They need to know that you are the one that’s in charge and that for certain behaviors, they will be reprimanded or scolded, but for others, they will be praised.

However, it’s never a good idea to send a Bullmastiff to a kennel or pen if they have not behaved correctly or even as a part of their natural routine. They want to be around people and can become irritated and hard to manage when this interaction is taken away from them.

It’s important that the owner of this breed be able to assert their authority over the dog, as this is what will make the dog see that they are being loyal to the right person. Be sure to demonstrate that you are in control of the situation at all times.